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Monthly Archives: February 2012

Colour Pools

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

Last weekend, I sewed this quick table runner. The pattern is by Deborah Vollbracht and was featured in McCall’s Quilting magazine, my constant source of both, inspiration and instruction for new sewing techniques.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

My attention was drawn to this particular pattern because, although there are curved lines enough, no curved piecing is required. Plus I liked the fact that piecing, quilting, and finishing, all is combined so that there is not the ordinary way of piecing, then quilting, and then binding.

Each of the nine blocks is a circle, pieced and furnished with batting and backing. When turned right side out, they each looked like a pancake. The nine circles are joined, sewing straight lines along the sides of the circles. And the last step is to stitch the flaps, which formed when joining the circles, down to the circles’ centres.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

The back of the table runner shows the curved quilting lines of the last step—all done in one continuous line!

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

New York Beauty

© 2012 by hs

I just did the first New York Beauty block in my life. I think it is a great pattern, and I have yet to see an ugly one (choice of fabrics excepted).

I admit that I am a little afraid of sewing curves. But seeing so many beautiful quilts with this pattern, I thought, if they can do it why not I?

Okay, it was certainly harder than sewing only straight lines, but then it was much easier than I thought. Maybe years of sewing straight lines somehow prepares you for sewing curves … I don’t know. I am satisfied with the result and now I am tempted to sew some more New York Beauty blocks since I don’t know what to do with this one little block.

Amish inspires

I adore Amish quilts. I love the plain motifs, the clear colours, and the elaborate quilting. I have a high respect for the Amish in general. I find their way of living, their values, and their craftsmanship truely inspiring.

© 1999 by as

When visiting the US, we travelled through several states, and I liked it best in Dutch Country in Pennsylvania. We stayed a couple of days in Lancaster, and I soked up what I could of the Amish culture.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

What you see here, is my first attempt at an Amish quilt. It is a wall hanging, 53″ x 53″.

Looking back, I do not know why I chose exactly those fabrics. I am not quite happy with them. The grey of the middle square and the binding is still fine with me. But as for the rest … mmmh.

I like the wall hanging when looked at from a distance, when you can discern nothing but the simple square in a square motif. On a close-up, however, you can examine my hand quilting.

© 2012 by hs

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

The LeMoyne star and the feathered wreath on the grey fabric, as well as the quilt pattern on the light green border were inspired by antique Amish quilts. I understand that these were very popular motifs and maybe still are.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

For the dark green border, I had to use what quilt stencils I had at hand (which are not many). Most of them were to small for this wide border, and in the end, only my feather stencil qualified for the job.

For marking the quilting lines, I used my brand new retractable chalk pencil. I am never going to use anything else! You get the finest lines, clear and exact, and yet easy to erase. Whether using a stencil, drawing lines with a ruler, or marking free-hand—it is just perfect!

Nostalgia flash Friday

Today, I am indulging in the memories of Bath.

© 2009 by hs

© 2009 by as

© 2009 by hs

© 2009 by as

© 2009 by as

Hag’s cushions

My sister came across a fun pattern. It is called “Hag’s cushion”.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

Basically, it is nothing but a simple log cabin design. Each pillow case consists of four log cabin blocks made of four different fabrics. The four blocks are joined and then sewn into a case. After that, each pillow case has a front side where you can see only two of the fabrics used, and a back side where you can find the other two fabrics. The hag thing about it is that you cannot make out the final seam after stuffing them because it is not at either of the sides where you would usually look for it.

They are very easy but the result is stunning. And there are endless possibilities as to fabric choice and making up the log cabin blocks. I have yet to find out what they would look like when using only two fabrics or as many as twelve!

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

Patchwork universe

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

I am so happy to be connected with other quilters all over the world. Via blogs, twitter, pinterest, to name just a few. Though I am not in the happy position to live at a place where there are quilt guilds or bees in the neighbourhood, or even quilting stores around the corner to supply my needs, I always knew that there were a whole lot of other quilters “out there”. But I scarcely ever knew what they were up to!

The internet now allows us all to share what we already shared before—our beloved needlework—but in a new and fascinatingly all-embracing way. I truly feel much more globally connected through this than I ever felt connected with a friend or relative who lives far away and never corresponds.

And even if I go where there are no other quilters to be expected, I meet with like-mindeds—or rather their products. Or maybe it is the other way round: I see quilt patterns everywhere because I deal with the matter so much.

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

The past weekend, I was at a hotel with our brass orchestra. We do this every year in order to practise for our upcoming concert. We stayed at this particular place several times already, but I never noticed the streamers, or the Ohio Star on the inn’s floor. This time, they literally sprang into my face.

Inspiration for our daily quilting is to be met with anywhere!

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

Nostalgia flash Friday

© 2009 by as

© 2009 by as

Lanhydrock House and Garden in Bodmin, Cornwall. It is hard to say which place I liked best on our last trip to England but Lanhydrock is clearly ranking very highly.

© 2009 by hs

© 2009 by hs

We had several unexpected encounters there, one was a wedding party, others were birds.

© 2009 by as

© 2009 by as