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Monthly Archives: August 2013

Farmer’s wife: Attic Windows

Wow! I arrived at block no. 1, meaning block no. 111 for me. Unfathomable!

Attic Windows

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

Here again, I used one of my favourite prints for the large pieces, as I just did in Autumn Tints. Plus, on this last block I got another opportunity to wholly paper piece a block. I only did this with three other blocks: Economy, Kitchen Woodbox, and Gentleman’s Fancy. And I like all four of them very well indeed. Not for the accuracy only, but for the design as well.

This is a happy and a sad day. Having finished the 111th block means that there are no more left to be done. Yet, I would be delighted to sew 111 more. It was so diverting to make these blocks—each with a different claim to choice of fabric, colour combination, and method. Challenging and rewarding at the same time.

Next, of course, is the challenge of putting these 111 blocks together. I have some ideas in mind, but am still not decided. I will try out some ideas on the computer first and then head for the quilt shop 🙂

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Farmer’s wife: Autumn Tints

With no autumn colours in my colour range for this sampler, I put all stress on the choice of prints and the direction of the designs. It was fun and easy with such a simple pattern consisting of two different sized squares only.

Autumn Tints

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

In the two big squares, I wanted to show off some of my favourite print which I wasn’t able to use very often in this sampler due to the small pieces so frequently needed. But now I am very happy to have the opportunity to use it once more.

And of course, I did not paper piece this one. It went together with my eyes closed—almost!

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Farmer’s wife: Basket

This is the basket block I like best in the farmer’s wife sampler. With the benefit of hindsight, I might have liked to use a different green print for the centre square of the basket. But otherwise, it is a very pretty block.

Basket

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

Another very similar basket block was Flower Basket, the more commonly known basket block types were Grape Basket and Fruit Basket, and yet another one was Strawberry Basket.

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Farmer’s wife: Basket Weave

This is the second block in the farmer’s wife sampler where you can—not necessarily, but you can—see a swastika. And though I didn’t mind in Farmer’s Puzzle, I objected to it now. Hence, I watched out for other ways of doing a basket weave block, and I found lots of. A very popular way of sewing a basket weave is this:

Basket Weave

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

I might even have liked it better if I had used four different prints so that the white one wasn’t as dominant as it is now. But at least I reached my goal: no national socialism in this block.

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Farmer’s wife: Bat Wing

Bat Wing

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

In this block, I did what I always wanted to do ever since I bought these two prints: I used them in one block, and only them. I thought it would happen earlier but it seems I had no opportunity so far.

With this block, I think it is essential to use only two different prints. I saw examples where the centre square or even the centre strip had different prints/colours, thus totally destroying the motif. You were never able to see any bat in them. Keeping it simple is often a good design recipe, anyway.

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Farmer’s wife: Big Dipper

The Big Dipper is the constellation that is called “great bear” or “big trolley” in German, or “the Plough” in English.

Big Dipper

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

© 2013 by Heike Scharmann

I cannot see why this block is named after this constellation. But I made the amazing discovery that it looks definitely different when set on point—much better, in fact! I saw examples of this block using three or even four different prints, thus carving out the center pinwheel much better than in this two-print version. But I still decided on two prints because I like the idea of seeing as much as possible in this block.

By the way, I did not paper piece this one. Instead, I measured the final length at the side of the quarter square triangle, added 1.25 inch to this and cut squares of this size. Out of two squares of a different print you get two quarter square triangle squares.

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