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Tag Archives: quilting

Getting along

“Getting along” seems pretty fitting for my life these days. I am getting along with my new project to which I hinted in my last post. I am getting along with my “new” life, introducing my new old surname as inconspicuously as possible. My life changed a lot these past years, and I am still struggling with the “new”.

I got along well, however, with my British themed quilt. I finished it yesterday and am now proudly displaying it here and in the sitting room of my new flat.

 

(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

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(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

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(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

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(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

I can even show you another finished little project: a pincushion I made for my sister’s birthday on Tuesday. I planned to buy some stuff to further embellish it, like buttons or a charm but I wasn’t able to get to the store through opening hours because I am working six days a week these last summer weeks.

(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

And here, as hinted, is a small detail of my running big project. It came to a halt last week, though, for the lack of one colour. I wasn’t quite content with the suggested one, so I left it out and ordered two alternative colours but they haven’t arrived yet.

(c) 2014 by hs

(c) 2014 by hs

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Farmer’s wife: Quilting

The quilting on my Farmer’s Wife quilt is done. It was done in no time—or so it seemed to me. As I imagined beforehand, I enjoyed re-visiting each square so much.

© 2014 by hs

© 2014 by hs

So another big projects draws to a close. I quilted the outer border in just two days. Now I am only waiting for my fingers to rejuvenate so that I might finish the quilt with a binding. Or rather, with no binding at all.

© 2014 by hs

© 2014 by hs

I had planned to bind the quilt by folding the backing fabric to the front, but it turned out that there is a small distance at one edge of the quilt where the backing fabric is too short. Now I am thinking about finishing the quilt with no binding. The alternative would be to buy binding fabric. Hard decision …

© 2014 by hs

© 2014 by hs

I also thought about labeling each of the 110 squares by embroidering their names on the sashing strips. I would have liked this a lot. But I didn’t come to a satisfactory solution as to how to do it, floss, and colour, without losing the present look and feel. Besides, I think I should have done any embroidery before making the quilt sandwich, so I put the idea aside. So it seems the finishing date is only a few days away.

Farmer’s wife: Storm Signal

I am amazed how well this block turned out. I don’t know why I was so afraid that this particular block wouldn’t. It was not the easiest block so far, but it was by no means the hardest. Maybe it was because I wanted this block to be particularly exact.

Storm Signal

© 2012 by Heike Scharmann

When browsing for other quilters’ examples, I realised that this block looks best when using very clear colours in the centre. I came across one example where the outer parts were very dark, and I liked this one too, but then decided to use the darkest shade in the centre in order to gain as much contrast as possible.

This block will be one of the “losers” when turning it on point in the end (when assembling the quilt top). It looks best when looked at as shown in the picture above. I had some losers so far, but rather minor ones: Windmill, Waste Not, and Tall Pine Tree. For other blocks, it doesn’t really matter which way you look at them. And of course there were several gainers so far, which only work when turning them on point: Tulip, Temperance Tree, and Strawberry Basket.

New York Beauty

© 2012 by hs

I just did the first New York Beauty block in my life. I think it is a great pattern, and I have yet to see an ugly one (choice of fabrics excepted).

I admit that I am a little afraid of sewing curves. But seeing so many beautiful quilts with this pattern, I thought, if they can do it why not I?

Okay, it was certainly harder than sewing only straight lines, but then it was much easier than I thought. Maybe years of sewing straight lines somehow prepares you for sewing curves … I don’t know. I am satisfied with the result and now I am tempted to sew some more New York Beauty blocks since I don’t know what to do with this one little block.

Layer, baste, and quilt

This is always the final instruction, the last step of each quilt pattern in McCalls Quilting Magazine. “Layer, baste, and quilt.” Like “Ready, steady, go!“ or some spell that—if pronounced correctly—will magically turn your quilt top into a quilt sandwich, a flock of small silver needles busily coming up and down through the fabric layers, threads buzzing so fast that you can hardly make them out. Wouldn’t that be nice!

I always found it a little strange that the task of quilting your quilt is described only in one step, a short paragraph. Of course, there is no need for step-by-step photos for this process. But considering how much work still lies ahead and how long it will take, I always thought quilting your quilt would need a little more than this.

I am often inspired by seeing what other people did. I get my best ideas by looking at other people’s works. So I would appreciate more detailed photos of the quilt patterns in McCalls. If I can have a close look I am quick to decide if I like it or not. And if not, what would work better (with my taste). In rough, this is one possible way to make decisions on how to quilt, where and what, and how much.

© 2011 by Heike Scharmann

Layer, baste, and quilt apparently is not a spell. In fact, it means that I must leave my sewing space, move the dinner table and chairs to make room for—this time—America the Beautiful, 73 to 95 inches. This always means some havoc, and I need to make sure either that I have time enough to do all the basting at once, or that we do not need the dining room for some time.

Furthermore, it appears that this work does not agree with my knees anymore. I always felt a little sore at my knees and my fingertips after crawling for two hours on our tiled floor and pulling up the needle so many times, or recently pulling up and closing so many safety pins. But now my knees have reached an age where they demand at least a cushion.

I promise you now that I will post some detail photos of my quilting as soon as I am done.

© 2011 by Heike Scharmann

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